【pc28微信群那个福利好 】

时间: 2019-11-18 12:13:00 pc28微信群那个福利好 热fdst4wesgz:99℃

【pc28微信群那个福利好 】,/p>

Until 10 years ago, almost to the day, the most senior judges in the land sat in the House of Lords. Along with the government they formed an integral part of parliament, while maintaining their independence. No other country in the world had both its judiciary and its executive embedded within the legislature. The head of the judiciary, the Lord Chancellor, even sat in the Cabinet.

All that changed when Tony Blair’s Labour government decided, for no obvious reason, to dismantle what had been a perfectly workable, if somewhat haphazard, constitutional settlement. 

But if the reason was not obvious, the consequences have subsequently become apparent. It manifestly shifted the balance of powers...

Until 10 years ago, almost to the day, the most senior judges in the land sat in the House of Lords. Along with the government they formed an integral part of parliament, while maintaining their independence. No other country in the world had both its judiciary and its executive embedded within the legislature. The head of the judiciary, the Lord Chancellor, even sat in the Cabinet.

All that changed when Tony Blair’s Labour government decided, for no obvious reason, to dismantle what had been a perfectly workable, if somewhat haphazard, constitutional settlement. 

But if the reason was not obvious, the consequences have subsequently become apparent. It manifestly shifted the balance of powers...

Until 10 years ago, almost to the day, the most senior judges in the land sat in the House of Lords. Along with the government they formed an integral part of parliament, while maintaining their independence. No other country in the world had both its judiciary and its executive embedded within the legislature. The head of the judiciary, the Lord Chancellor, even sat in the Cabinet.

All that changed when Tony Blair’s Labour government decided, for no obvious reason, to dismantle what had been a perfectly workable, if somewhat haphazard, constitutional settlement. 

But if the reason was not obvious, the consequences have subsequently become apparent. It manifestly shifted the balance of powers...

Until 10 years ago, almost to the day, the most senior judges in the land sat in the House of Lords. Along with the government they formed an integral part of parliament, while maintaining their independence. No other country in the world had both its judiciary and its executive embedded within the legislature. The head of the judiciary, the Lord Chancellor, even sat in the Cabinet.

All that changed when Tony Blair’s Labour government decided, for no obvious reason, to dismantle what had been a perfectly workable, if somewhat haphazard, constitutional settlement. 

But if the reason was not obvious, the consequences have subsequently become apparent. It manifestly shifted the balance of powers...